Mary Crossan

Professor
Expertise: Leadership, Strategic Leadership, Leader Character

Mary Crossan is a Professor of Strategic Leadership at the Ivey Business School and was awarded Western University’s highest honour – Distinguished University Professor – for sustained excellence in teaching, research, and service over a substantial career at Western. Prior to joining Ivey, Mary worked for such organizations as Bell Canada, the RCMP, Finance Canada, and the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

Mary’s research focuses on organizational learning and strategic renewal, leader character and improvisation, and has been widely published. She is an author of Developing Leadership Characterthe Strategic Analysis and Action textbook, and has been acknowledged as one of the top case-writers in the world – her Starbucks case has sold over 100,000 copies worldwide.

Mary’s research, case-writing, and consulting have provided her broad exposure to top organizations around the world, including HSBC, Mattel Asia, Bank of Montreal, TD Bank Financial Group, CIBC, Sun Life, Manulife, several public sector organizations, and an NHL team.

Programs

Senior Public Sector Leader Program

Strengthening Canadian public service. Preparing the next generation of public sector leaders.

An intense, interactive learning experience based on the key challenges public sector leaders face.

2021

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Practice & Community Leadership for Family Physicians

Charting the future of primary care

Learn how to meet primary care challenges with innovative responses through the examination of best-practice leadership models from around the globe.

TBD

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Articles

May 21st, 2020

Combatting COVID-19 with leader character

Ivey Academy professor Mary Crossan is joined by Canada Revenue Agency's Steve Virgin to discuss how you can develop your own leader character, how teams can work together cohesively, what organizations can do to activate collective character, and how to use leader character to continue to address the many pressing problems that had previously seemed intractable.

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