Rob Austin

Professor
Expertise: Simulations, Design, Digital Transformation, Innovation, Learning Innovation, Technology Management, Information Technology, Cybersecurity

Rob Austin is a Professor of Innovation and Information Systems, and an affiliated faculty member at Harvard Medical School and Aarhus School of Business and Social Sciences. At The Ivey Academy, Rob is the Program Director of Charting the Future of Primary Care: Leadership, Teams, and Culture. He has worked extensively with corporate clients, including BP, CIBC, Citrix Systems, Hewlett Packard, IBM, LL Bean, Maersk Oil and Gas, Microsoft, Pfizer, Roche, Symantec, UPS, and the United States House of Representatives. 

Rob is the author of nine books and has published widely in both academic and professional journals, such as Harvard Business Review, Information Systems Research, MIT Sloan Management Review, Organization Science, Organization Studies, and the Wall Street Journal. He also is the author of more than 50 published cases and notes, three Harvard online products, and two popular Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) running on the Coursera platform.

Programs

Practice & Community Leadership for Family Physicians

Charting the future of primary care

Learn how to meet primary care challenges with innovative responses through the examination of best-practice leadership models from around the globe.

Starts January 13, 2021

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Managing for Innovation

Why is innovation hard for organizations?

Explore different approaches to innovation, learn to avoid pitfalls, and tackle future challenges as an "innovation manager."

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Articles

August 5th, 2020

Crisis and opportunity

In the latest issue of Ivey Business Journal, innovation expert Rob Austin and The Ivey Academy's executive director, Mark Healy, discuss how the pandemic has many organizations experimenting and innovating.

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July 10th, 2020

Innovating in a pandemic: Is there opportunity within adversity?

Innovation expert and Ivey professor Rob Austin discusses the relationship between "jolts" and innovation, why innovation tends to be difficult for organizations during normal times, and shared examples of ways the pandemic may be driving important innovation.

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