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Courses

Business 1220E: Introduction to Business

Business 1220E, a first-year introductory survey course, gives students from all faculties the opportunity to learn business fundamentals in finance, marketing, operations, organizational behavior and general management. This essay course will be particularly appealing to those students who want a class experience akin to courses taught in Ivey’s HBA program. Delivered through Ivey’s renowned case method, the course challenges students to learn by doing, within an active class environment of no more than 75 to 80 students. Many students believe this course provides an excellent foundation for Business 2257. Students explore real business issues, make management decisions, defend their position, and take action. 

Students are expected to learn about the problems managers face and gain an understanding of the environment in which managers make decisions. Above all, students will develop the capacity to make sound and timely decisions based on available, and often imperfect, information.

Business 1299E: Business for Engineers

Students learn business fundamentals in finance, marketing, engineering economics, organizational behavior and general management. Students are taught business decision-making using Ivey’s renowned case method, wherein students explore real business issues, make management decisions, defend their position, and take action, within an active class environment of no more than 85 students. Taking business in first year enables students to understand engineering in context – in today’s world, business is fundamental knowledge for professional engineering.

Business 2257: Accounting and Business Analysis

Business 2257, a second-year, honors-level business course, introduces students to the accounting transactions necessary for the preparation of financial statements, in the first term.  This course (1) introduces students to the current accounting methods for developing financial statements; (2) provides students with an introduction to analytical management tools that assist business decision-making; (3) builds problem-solving capabilities; and (4) provides a foundation of knowledge as a building block for the first year of Ivey’s HBA Program and for various other degree programs at Western.

In the second term, students combine their understanding of financial statements with other decision-making analytical tools to make and defend business decisions. In addition, the second term includes a new venture feasibility study (done in groups) that includes both a written report and an oral presentation. This course, delivered through Ivey’s renowned case method, challenges students to learn by doing within an active class environment of 80 to 85 students.

Business 2295F: Business for Science Students

This introductory survey course provides students in the Faculty of Science or the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, with an understanding of how business operates. Students are taught the basics of finance, organizational behaviour and intellectual property using Ivey’s renowned case method of teaching. This teaching method challenges students to learn by doing within an active class environment of up to 75 students.

The Business 2295F course (1) exposes students to financial management and the management of people in organizations; (2) provides an understanding of how business operates; (3) develops an appreciation for the difference between the technical, quantifiable world of science and the uncertain socio-economic world of business; (4) provides students with the skills for effective problem solving and the opportunity to practise making decisions, often with imperfect information and under time constraints; and (5) develops both written and oral communication skills.

Business 2299E: Business for Engineers

This introductory survey course provides students in the Faculty of Engineering, with an understanding of how business operates. Students are taught the basics of finance, organizational behaviour and intellectual property using Ivey’s renowned case method of teaching. This teaching method challenges students to learn by doing within an active class environment of up to 75 students.

The Business 2295F course (1) exposes students to financial management and the management of people in organizations; (2) provides an understanding of how business operates; (3) develops an appreciation for the difference between the technical, quantifiable world of science and the uncertain socio-economic world of business; (4) provides students with the skills for effective problem solving and the opportunity to practise making decisions, often with imperfect information and under time constraints; and (5) develops both written and oral communication skills.