Skip to Main Content
International Business Institute

International Education Article and Book Chapter Abstracts

International Education Article and Book Chapter Abstracts

A Bibliography of Ivey-authored International Education-Related Publications
As of August 23, 2017

Refereed Articles

Beamish, P.W., 2017, "The Transferability of Western Business Education to the East", Journal of Management Studies, Forthcoming.

Keywords : Case method; Innovation; Knowledge transfers.

Abstracts: This essay focuses on the transference of a business education practice common in the West – the use of the case method – to the East (specifically China).  It is framed according to Rogers’ ‘Diffusion of Innovation’ model.  Selective innovation examples from 21 case studies across 15 “contextual” themes are presented.  They include specific reference to theories, models, and cultural traditions from various countries in the east.  Milestones are reviewed regarding the introduction of the case method which were initiated in China.  The paper argues that China has completed the early majority stage in terms of the diffusion of the case method in its business schools.

 

Konrad, A.M., Seidel, M-D., Lo, E., Bhardwaj, A., Qureshi, I., 2017, "Variety, Dissimilarity, and Status Centrality in MBA Networks: Is the Minority or the Majority More Likely to Network across Diversity?", Academy of Management Learning & Education, Forthcoming.

Keywords : Diversity and Management education; MBA education; Network Diversity; Gender; International Students; Variety and dissimilarity; Status; Social.

Abstract : The value of the networks that MBA students develop is often limited by the tendency of people to favor connections with similar others, resulting in self-segregation among identity groups. In order to identify the origins of network diversity, a key question for theory and practice is whether majority or minority groups are more likely to develop diverse personal networks. This paper provides a partial answer to this question by integrating network theory with three conceptual dimensions of diversity: variety, dissimilarity, and status. This conceptualization suggests that individuals can display three distinct types of diversity in their networks with different theoretical antecedents and outcomes. Consistent with theoretical predictions, we find systematic differences between the networks of high-status majorities and low-status minorities in a longitudinal study of MBA student networks. Specifically, minorities show more variety, greater dissimilarity and lower status centrality in their networks compared to majorities. Tie strength and time period affect the findings in predictable ways. These results demonstrate the value of integrating diversity theory with network theory for understanding the development of inclusive networks in business schools. We conclude by discussing potential remedies to enhance the diversity of MBA student networks.

 

Huq, F.A., Chowdhury, I.N., Klassen, R.D., 2016, "Social Management Capabilities of Multinational Buying Firms and their Emerging Market Suppliers: An Exploratory Study of the Clothing Industry", Journal of Operations Management, 46: 19 - 37.

Keywords : Social sustainability; Supply chain; Capabilities; Clothing industry; Longitudinal case study; Stakeholder theory.

Abstract : For sustainability, research in operations and supply chain management historically emphasized the development of environmental rather than social capabilities. However, factory disasters in Bangladesh, an emerging market and the second largest clothing exporter in the world, revealed enormous challenges in the implementation of social sustainability in complex global supply chains. Against the backdrop of a building collapse in Bangladesh's clothing industry, this research uses multiple case studies from two time periods to explore the skills, practices, relationships and processes – collectively termed “social management capabilities” (SMCs) – that help buyers and suppliers respond to stakeholder pressures; address regulatory gaps; and improve social performance. The study not only captures the perspectives of both multinational buyers and their emerging market suppliers, but also provides supplementary evidence from other key stakeholders, such as NGOs and unions. Our findings show that, in the absence of intense stakeholder pressure, buyers can lay the foundation for improved social performance by using their own auditors and collaborating with suppliers rather than using third-party auditors. However, in the face of acute attention from customers, NGOs and media, we observed that consultative buyer-consortium audits emerged, and shared third-party audits offered other advantages such as increased transparency and improvements in worker education and training. Finally, we present research propositions derived from our empirical study to guide future research on implementing social sustainability in emerging markets.

 

Lim, D.S.K., Oh, C-H., De Clercq, D., 2016, "Engagement in Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies: Interactive Effects of Individual-level Factors and Institutional Conditions", International Business Review, 25(4): 933 - 945.

Keywords : Comparative international entrepreneurship; Institutions; Entrepreneurship in emerging economies; Multilevel analysis.

Abstract : This paper examines individuals’ engagement in entrepreneurship in emerging economies. We conceive of such engagement as encompassing opportunity discovery, evaluation, and exploitation. We investigate the influence of individuals’ household income and level of education on their engagement in entrepreneurship, as well as the interaction effects between these individual-level factors and country-level regulatory, cognitive, and normative institutions. We test our hypotheses on a multi-source dataset from 22 emerging economies using a multilevel analysis technique. Our results indicate that the direct effect of individuals’ household income on their engagement in entrepreneurship is persistent, regardless of institutional conditions; but the influence of education level varies contingent upon various institutional conditions.

 

Peng, A., Van Dyne, L., Oh, K., 2015, "The Influence of Motivational Cultural Intelligence on Cultural Effectiveness Based on Study Abroad: The Moderating Role of Participants’ Cultural Identity", Journal of Management Education, 39(5): 572 - 596.

Abstract : This study examines the influence of motivational cultural intelligence (CQ) on the development of cultural effectiveness among university short-term business study abroad program participants. We conceptualize cultural effectiveness as the degree of psychological comfort and success in managing intercultural demands. Results of a multiple-source, two-wave lagged study demonstrate that initial levels of motivational CQ were positively associated with increases in (a) cultural well-being reported by participants and (b) peer perceptions of suitability for overseas work. In addition, cultural identity, an individual’s psychological identification with his or her own national culture, strengthened the time-lagged relationship between motivational CQ and peer-rated suitability for overseas work. Participants with strong cultural identity and low motivational CQ were viewed as the least suitable for an overseas job. We discuss practical implications for designing cross-cultural education programs and implications for future research.

 

Beamish, P.W., 1998, "Internationalization of Educational Schools: A Managed-Change Process", Review of Business, 20(2): 4,5,43.

Keywords : Internationalization; Implementation; Change.

Abstract : Internationalization is not easy as business schools have discovered. It is constantly evolving, expensive, time consuming, multifaceted but absolutely essential for institutional relevance. In this paper, the experiences of the Ivey Business School at the University of Western Ontario in attempting to internationalize its faculty and curriculum attest to this. Internationalization evolves awareness of the future impact of global forces and new attitudes and actions for conducting business with international entities. In a business school, it involves recognition of the impact of internationalization by the faculty and ultimately the students. The desired end is to increase the competency of managers involved in international business to meet the demand of a global economy. The issue is not whether to internationalize, but how.

 

Schuster, C., Zimmerman, R., Schertzer, C., Beamish, P.W., 1998, "Assessing the Impact of Executive MBA International Travel Courses", Journal of Marketing Education, 20(2): 121 - 132. 

Keywords : Executive MBA; Travel course; Education.

Abstract : Over half of the more than 130 executive MBA (EMBA) programs that currently exist around the world include an overseas component. A primary justification for including an overseas component rather than, or in addition to, teaching an international business course on campus is that participants learn more by traveling to another country. However, no systematic assessment has been conducted to identify the impact of these courses on knowledge attitudes, and behaviors toward business. The assessment procedures in this study involved 90 participants in five groups of four EMBA international travel courses. The results of this study indicate that these international travel courses do affect cognitive, attitudinal, and behavioral learning of the participants.

 

Baetz, M., Beamish, P.W., 1989, "North American Experience with Business Policy Field Projects", Management Education and Development, 20(1): 112 - 123.

Keywords : MBA; Education; Pedagogy; Field research.

Abstract : This paper reports on student and site manager evaluations of Business Policy fields projects from five universities in Canada and the United States. In total, there were over 900 detailed evaluations by students and site managers and more limited assessments from another 1200 students. A preliminary analysis is presented of various factors which potentially influenced these evaluations. The single biggest negative aspect of the project was seen by students to be the time allocated to the project. This suggests that schools should modify their programmes to ensure students have the time to carry out the projects in a meaningful way. Another major problem with the project identified by students is the lack of faculty direction and unclear expectations. This suggests that faculty must clearly specify their objectives for the project so students will appreciate the many varied benefits from it.

 

Beamish, P.W., Calof, J., 1989, "International Business Education: A Corporate View", Journal of International Business Studies, 20(3): 553 - 564.

Keywords : Internationalization; Education.

Abstract : As a preliminary step in the internationalization of business school curricula, 122 major Canadian corporations were surveyed for their views of the importance of various management skills and international courses, as well as their opinion on the mechanisms (institutions and academics) for delivering them. This article reports on the responses obtained and suggests methods for improving the overall effectiveness of international business education.

 

Non-Refereed Articles

Dhanaraj, C.M., Beamish, P.W., 2009, "The Learning Space", Times of India, Special Report, June 8, p.62.

Abstract : This article addresses why research is vital for B-schools, particularly in Asia. Rapid growth in China and India has created new demands for research; however, each country’s B-schools face different research issues. The benefits of research are explored including: international partnerships, relationships between academics and business executives, and a research network.

 

Beamish, P.W., 1997, "Internationalization as Strategic Change at The Ivey Business School", Management Education Review (in Korean), 1(2): 53 - 68.

Keywords : Management education; Internationalization; Strategic change; Emerging markets.

Abstract : As all business schools have discovered, internationalization is not easy. It legitimately means different things to different people; it is constantly evolving; expensive in time and money; multifaceted; and to those of us who are among the committed minority, absolutely essential for institutional relevance. The purpose of this paper is to share the recent experiences of the Richard Ivey School of Business (formerly Western Business School), Ontario, Canada, in its attempt to further internationalize its faculty, curriculum, and programs. It is not intended as a general guideline or blueprint for what other business schools should or should not do because internationalization in its operationalization is situation specific: greatly dependent on the prevailing institutional culture, history, resources, and attitudes. The basic premise of this paper is that internationalization is an exercise in strategic change. A change framework we have found useful provides a structure for the discussion. The first part of the chapter provides an overview of the school and its major international programs and emphasis. This context is essential to understanding the current stage of the school's internationalization activities, as described in the second section. It looks at the school's activities in relation to a framework on 'Achieving Readiness for Strategic Change.' Here the change targets are the development of awareness, capability, and commitment. The second part concludes with a review of some of the school's yet-to-be resolved questions.

 

White, R.E., Pierce, B.D., Rush, J.C., 1994, "Educating for Change", Ivey Business Quarterly, 59(2): 53 – 61.

Keywords : Organizational change, Manycompanies, Management training, Management development.

Abstract : John Turner, a program manager with the executive education group at Ford Motor Co., was always on the lookout for unmet training needs. Turner heard from the Asia/Pacific joint venture managers that their joint venture partnership relationships were not being managed well, yet they are the key to the way the joint venture managers will be doing business in the area. Turner and his colleagues at the Ford Executive Development Center understood that a typical training program could not make a meaningful contribution to resolving the concerns about the company's Asian joint ventures. There are 3 ways in which corporate education can be used: 1. the reactive role, 2. the responsive role, and 3. the re-creative role. The experiences of Ford, 3M Canada, National Semiconductor, and Bank of Montreal are discussed.

 

Beamish, P.W., 1988, "A Gap in the Business Curriculum?", Canadian Business Review, The Conference Board of Canada, 15(4): Winter, 28-30.

Keywords : Publications; International; Education; Curricula; Business schools; Business.

Abstract : A great myth among some Canadian corporations and academic circles is that the Canadian market is so similar to that of the US that doing business with each other is not international business, but just an extension of the domestic market. Prominent Canadian chief executives observed that the US is not a homogenous market and that the business climate is more competitive and aggressive in the US. Several studies have looked at how to improve the export performance of Canadian companies. One study suggested better training in international business. Data revealed an indirect relationship between training and export performance. In the US, 118 undergraduate and 94 graduate business schools require students to take at least one international business course, but only a few Canadian schools have the requirement. Using the number of articles that academics published in international business publications as an indicator, Canadian academics were found to be at least as well qualified as Americans to provide training.

 

Beamish, Paul W., 1986, “Train for World Business”, Policy Options, March, 24-25.

Abstract : Canada is participating in more trade with the United States and other countries, but how well is it positioned to take advantage of trade opportunities? Based on a 64-question mail survey of 116 exporting firms in Ontario, one question asked how much training individuals involved in export operations had in international business. Although training in international business positively correlated with export performance, no Canadian business school has a required course in International Business. Canada needs the business graduates with the proper type of training.

 

Chapters

Beamish, Paul W., 2016 “The Case-Study Legacy of Ivey’s Early Linkages in China” in R. Hayhoe, J. Pan and Q. Zha (eds) Canadian Universities in China’s Transformation: An Untold Story, McGill-Queen’s University Press, pg. 125 - 137.

Abstract : For the past thirty years, the Ivey Business School at Western University has been very active in China, much more so than most university business schools from Canada or elsewhere. Many of these activities have been in relation to introducing and popularizing the case method in China. Yet school activities have gone well beyond this emphasis. Of particular note is the fact that Ivey was the very first business school from the US or Canada to establish a full degree program campus in greater China. This chapter is divided into two sections. The first part examines Ivey’s case-study initiatives in China. Several of these started in the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) funding era. The second part examines the longer-term consequences and contributions from the original university linkages.

 

Beamish, P. W., 2012, “How to Find, Produce and Integrate Case Studies That Promote PRME Values”, Inspirational Guide for the Implementation of PRME: Placing Sustainability at the Heart of Management Education, p. 190 - 192.

Abstract : The Ivey Business School at Western University was an early signatory to the United Nations Global Compact (GC) and the Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME). Ivey aimed to further the Ten Principles of the GC, but how? By utilizing the Ivey Publishing case collection, two actions were taken. The first was to determine how many cases in the collection match the GC’s Ten Principles and to make them distinguishable. The second was to publish a GC-focused textbook.

 

Beamish, Paul W., Gigi Wong and Joanne Shoveller, 2005, “Meeting China’s Need for Case-Based Teaching Material: The Ivey Business School Experience”, in J. McIntyre and I. Alon (eds) Business and Management Education in China: Transition, Pedagogy, and Training, New York, Singapore, World Scientific Publishing Co. Inc., pg. 195 - 203.

Abstract : This paper shares the experience of the Ivey Business School in its endeavours to assist in modernization of the MBA programs in China by the introduction of a large body of teaching materials (case studies) and faculty training programs (case writing/ case teaching). In 1991, China started the first MBA degree programs at nine selected business schools, all at top-tier national universities. Recognizing the rapidly escalating need for Chinese managers with international business skills and knowledge, the National MBA Education Supervisory Committee quickly increased the number of MBA programs to 62 by 2001. They further mandated that 25 per cent of China's MBA curriculum be delivered using the case method. The committee's endorsement of the case method created an immediate need for teaching materials and qualified instructors. Ivey saw that as an opportunity to assist in the development of China's institutional capacity for management education.

 

Beamish, P.W., 2003, "Internationalizing Doctoral Education in Business", "Internationalizing the Teaching/Curriculum Dimension of Doctoral Education: The Ivey Business School Experience", East Lansing, Michigan, Michigan State University Press.

Abstract : This chapter shares the experiences of the Ivey Business School, in its attempts to internationalize the teaching and curriculum dimension of doctoral education. It is not intended to be prescriptive because internationalization depends in great part on the institutional context. Nonetheless, some of what we have found useful (and not useful) may be applicable to other schools. While we have found some of the initiatives to be effective, several major barriers still exist. First, not all doctorals want to be internationalized. As a consequence, they neither capitalize on available opportunities nor expend any more effort than is required in the I.B. course. A second barrier is incomplete buy-in to internationalization by certain individual faculty members. Without positive reinforcement from faculty colleagues in the respective area groups, all of the Ph.D. program internationalization efforts in the world will not be effective. Notwithstanding these caveats, progress has been evidenced on several fronts. The two cornerstones of our approach have been the use of (a) field experiences and (b) a unique set of components within the International Business course which all of our doctorals are required to take. Each is considered in turn.

 

Beamish, Paul W., 1999, “International Business Education Via The Case Method” in B. Toyne and D. Nigh (eds.) International Business: Institutions and the Dissemination of Knowledge, Columbia, S.C., University of South Carolina Press, pg. 235 - 240.

Abstract : This chapter examined ways of making more effective and efficient use of the case method in international business education. The first section looks at the international case-writing process, and ways it can be improved. The second section looks at the in-class experience. Teaching with cases is not formula teaching. Numerous innovations are available for improving the overall experience for both student and professor. The third section concludes with some comments on using cases in degree versus executive programs. The essential message here is the need to match the complexity of the material with the international experience of the student.

 

Beamish, Paul W., 1997, “Internationalizing the Teaching/Curriculum Dimension of Doctoral Education: The Ivey Business School Experience,” in S. T. Cavusgil and N. E. Horn (eds.) Internationalizing Doctoral Education in Business, Michigan State University Press, pg. 201 - 211.

Abstract : This chapter shares the experiences of the Ivey Business School, in its attempts to internationalize the teaching and curriculum dimension of doctoral education. It is not intended to be prescriptive because internationalization depends in great part on the institutional context. Nonetheless, some of what we have found useful (and not useful) may be applicable to other schools. While we have found some of the initiatives to be effective, several major barriers still exist. First, not all doctorals want to be internationalized. As a consequence, they neither capitalize on available opportunities nor expend any more effort than is required in the I.B. course. A second barrier is incomplete buy-in to internationalization by certain individual faculty members. Without positive reinforcement from faculty colleagues in the respective area groups, all of the Ph.D. program internationalization efforts in the world will not be effective. Notwithstanding these caveats, progress has been evidenced on several fronts. The two cornerstones of our approach have been the use of (a) field experiences and (b) a unique set of components within the International Business course which all of our doctorals are required to take. Each is considered in turn.

 

Beamish, Paul W., 1993, “Internationalization as Strategic Change at The Western Business School (Canada)” in T. Cavusgil, (ed.) Internationalizing Business Education: Toward Meeting the Challenge, Michigan State University Press, pg. 153 - 166.

Abstract : Internationalization is not easy. It legitimately means different things to different people; it is constantly evolving; expensive in time and money; multi-faceted; and to those of us who are among the committed minority, absolutely essential for institutional relevance. The purpose of this paper is to share the recent experiences of the Western (now Ivey) Business School, in its attempts to further internationalize its faculty, curriculum, and programs.

The basic premise of this chapter is that internationalization is an exercise in strategic change. A change framework we have found useful provides a structure for the discussion. The first part of the chapter provides an overview of the school and its major international programs and emphasis. This context is essential to understanding the current stage of the school's internationalization activities, as described in the second section. It looks at the school's activities in relation to a framework on "Achieving Readiness for Strategic Change". Here the change targets are the development of awareness, capability, and commitment. The second part concludes with a review of some of the school's yet-to-be resolved questions.

 

Beamish, P.W., 1988, "International Business: Institutions and the Dissemination of Knowledge", "International Business Education Via The Case Method", Columbia, SC, University of South Carolina Press.

Abstract : This chapter examined ways of making more effective and efficient use of the case method in international business education. The first section looks at the international case-writing process, and ways it can be improved. The second section looks at the in-class experience. Teaching with cases is not formula teaching. Numerous innovations are available for improving the overall experience for both student and professor. The third section concludes with some comments on using cases in degree versus executive programs. The essential message here is the need to match the complexity of the material with the international experience of the student.

 

Beamish, P.W., Wong, G., Shoveller, J., 1982, "Business Education and Management Education in the People's Republic of China: Pedagogy, Development and Delivery Methods", "Meeting China's Need for Case-Based Teaching Material: The Ivey Business School Experience", New York, Singapore, World Scientific Publishing Co. Inc.

Abstract : This paper shares the experience of the Ivey Business School in its endeavours to assist in modernization of the MBA programs in China by the introduction of a large body of teaching materials (case studies) and faculty training programs (case writing/ case teaching). In 1991, China started the first MBA degree programs at nine selected business schools, all at top-tier national universities. Recognizing the rapidly escalating need for Chinese managers with international business skills and knowledge, the National MBA Education Supervisory Committee quickly increased the number of MBA programs to 62 by 2001. They further mandated that 25 per cent of China's MBA curriculum be delivered using the case method. The committee's endorsement of the case method created an immediate need for teaching materials and qualified instructors. Ivey saw that as an opportunity to assist in the development of China's institutional capacity for management education.