The Case Method Teaching

Ivey is famous for its practical, collaborative teaching approach. We rely extensively on the case method of study. We value learning by doing, learning by working with actual business challenges faced by real managers. During the Program, you will study hundreds of these cases. These are not stories; rather, they challenge your ability to analyze information, make decisions, and defend those decisions when others around you may disagree. By analyzing real business cases daily in class, you learn to become a manager. Case classes are more engaging than traditional lecture methods. HBAs advance ideas and debate them—often there is no right or wrong solution to the case. Unlike the traditional lecture method, which involves one-way delivery of accepted truths and ideas from a professor to a student, Ivey’s approach involves equal contribution from all members. Faculty ask questions of the HBA students, and vice versa. Students will pose questions to classmates and engage in lively debates. Faculty will also probe participants' observations to see if they can and will stand behind their statements.

Learning Teams 

At Ivey, individuals are responsible for their own learning. Everything we do is arranged to make that possible and to make it exciting. Learning by the case method is an example of a three-step process designed to facilitate individual learning. First, students prepare the cases on their own. Second, they discuss their ideas in small groups we call learning teams. Learning teams meet frequently to discuss cases before they come up in class. These team discussions allow students to try out ideas with fellow students to get feedback. 

Typically, team members become very close, relying on each other's support both inside and outside of the classroom. Third, cases (and other materials) are discussed in class under the direction of the faculty member. The faculty member's role is to encourage debate, to challenge students to think and to argue constructively, and to add to the discussion based on knowledge and experience. In short, we all work together to learn together.

Notebook Computers 

We are convinced that our students must be fully conversant with computer-assisted work styles in order to compete in today’s job market. As a result, all HBA students are required to have a notebook computer for use in the HBA Program. Our IT Department publishes current specifications for notebooks annually.