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Marketing

Marketing is fundamentally concerned with the description and prediction of decision outcomes, involving all aspects of the firm that relates to its customers, competitors, distributors, and business regulators. It is an interdisciplinary field that draws theories and methodologies from a variety of sources including psychology, sociology, mathematics, statistics and economics.

The doctoral program in Marketing is designed to produce scholars. We train our graduates to become academics in a university setting. We aim to produce teachers and researchers. If your interest is consulting, industry or other non-university sector employment, you would be better to pursue a MBA or MSc degree.

Marketing doctoral students take a series of courses, including research methods, marketing theory, consumer behavior, judgment and decision making, experimental design and others drawn from non-business areas such as economics, psychology, statistics and sociology. Other aspects of the program are tailored to fit the student’s own research, teaching and professional interests.

In the marketing seminars, professors normally participate in sessions related to their areas of expertise and research interests. Students consider recent scholarly work in the field, develop research approaches, increase their understanding of conceptualizations and models, and develop the ability to solve managerial problems in marketing. The seminars are sequenced so that in one seminar you will be with others who have entered the program earlier, and in a second seminar, with those who enter the program after you.

Areas of Research Focus

  • B2B and B2C relationships
  • Big data and social media
  • Marketing metrics
  • Branding
  • Radical innovations
  • Psychology of money
  • Gambling
  • Decision making
  • Political marketing
  • Marketing strategy
  • Addiction
  • Pricing

 

PhD Student Opportunities

The doctoral program in Marketing is recruiting students with the following research interests.

Professors Miranda Goode and Kirk Kristofferson are recruiting PhD students with an interest in the consumer behaviour area of marketing. We are looking for students interested in conducting experimental research, both in lab and field settings. We are open to students with research interests across consumer behaviour/consumer psychology topic areas, and especially students interested in experiential consumption and/or the psychology of money and financial decision-making (Dr. Goode) and social influence and persuasion (Dr. Kristofferson).

 

PhD Graduates

The doctoral program in Marketing is designed for those interested in pursuing academic careers in marketing at top business schools.

Dr. Peter Nguyen (2019 PhD)

Assistant Professor, Miami University in Ohio

PhD Dissertation:

Two Essays on Consumer-Generated Reviews: Reviewer Expertise and Mobile Reviews

Over the past few decades, the internet has risen to prominence, enabling consumers to not only quickly access large amounts of information, but also openly share content (e.g., blogs, videos, reviews) with a substantially large number of fellow consumers. Given the vast presence of consumers in the online space, it has become increasingly critical for marketers to better understand the way consumers share, and learn from, consumer-generated content, a research area known as electronic word-of-mouth. In this dissertation, I advance our understanding about the shared content generated by consumers on online review platforms. In Essay 1, I study why and how the expertise of consumers in generating reviews systematically shapes their rating evaluations and the downstream consequences this has on the aggregate valence metric... Read more


Faculty Advisor(s):

 

Dr. Vivek Astvansh (2018 PhD)

Assistant Professor, Indiana University

PhD Dissertation:

Toward a Better Understanding and Management of Product Recall

Product recalls have become increasingly common across product categories and countries. Although recalls pose adverse consequences for businesses, regulatory agencies, and society, they also test these stakeholders’ resilience in the face of adversity. Perhaps because scholars from multiple disciplines have studied recalls for nearly four decades now, a large number of terms, most of which stay undefined, has been used to describe recalls and several closely related yet distinct phenomena. We also lack a framework that can help synthesize our knowledge and guide us toward questions that are both interesting and relevant. Finally, there has been no attention to the fundamental question of what firm actions drive the effectiveness of recalls. My thesis seeks to address these two areas of improvement... Read more


Faculty Advisor(s):

Discipline Coordinator

Matt Thomson

Matt Thomson an associate professor in marketing at the Ivey Business School, Western University (Canada). His PhD (University of Southern California) was supervised by Debbie MacInnis and CW Park. He also earned degrees from Indiana University, Bloomington (MBA) and McGill University (BA). His primary research interests lie at the intersection of brands and consumer engagement such as through relationship- and experiential-marketing. He is an editorial board member of the Journal of Consumer Psychology and a fellow at the Brands & Brand Relationships Institute. He directed the PhD program at Ivey from July 2014 to 2017. Before becoming an academic, he worked for the Information, Privacy and Ethics Commissioner of Alberta.

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